Truck and Track Winter 20-21

Truck and Track Winter 20/21 www.truckandtrack.com 48 DANGEROUS GOODS 2021 is an odd number and, in the world of dangerous goods (DG), that means the biennial introduction of new regulations to govern their movement. Most of the changes emanate from those contained in the 21st Edition UN Recommendations on the Transport of Dangerous Goods - Model Regulations (“The Orange Book”) which was issued in the Summer of 2019. These recommendations were adapted to suit the specific requirements of eachmode of transport and are nowpublished in the relevant modal regulations for 2021. The current round of regulations took effect from 1st January 2021 and the changes for air transport became binding immediately. These amendments are laid out in the 2021/22 ICAO Technical Instructions and included in the 62nd Edition of the IATADangerous Goods Regulations, which is more widely recognised around the world as the industry reference. There is a 6-month transition before the new regulations are mandatory for road (ADR), rail (RID) and inland waterways (ADN). For sea transport, a year’s grace is normally given for the IMDGCode to become mandatory. However, this time around, the transition period has been extended until June 2022 as a consequence of Covid-19, the impact of which delayed the ratification of the final text and, consequently, the publication of the 40th Amendment. Indeed, the pandemic curtailed the implementation of some proposed amendments across all modes - although there is still plenty to consider. For road, the most obvious revision for 2021 is that the “European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road (ADR)” has lost the word “European” in its title. This is not, as one might cynically suggest, down to Brexit but due to the ever-increasing number of states that have become party to the accord, which now stands at 52. So, what’s new? There are far too many updates to cover here but, as always, there is a plethora of small changes and clarifications throughout the latest amendment. These include modifications to proper shipping names and the use of technical names, some deletions, a few updates to definitions of certain product types and revisions that affect the responsibilities of certain roles in the supply chain. There have also been many variations made to existing special provisions, and the addition of a few new ones. Lithium batteries are, once again, brought into focus. For example, there are new requirements for the safety assessments of damaged or defective lithiumbatteries (SP376), and new text (SP390) giving clarification of the marking of packages containing both lithium batteries in equipment and lithium batteries with equipment. There is also a number of new rules and exemptions relating to electrical energy storage, data loggers and cargo tracking devices. ADR 2021 also has at least 30 changes to packing instructions! One of the four new UN numbers that has been added for 2021 is UN3549 “MEDICAL WASTE, CATEGORY A, AFFECTING HUMANS, solid or MEDICAL WASTE, CATEGORY A, AFFECTING ANIMALS only, solid”. This was introduced, in part, following issues relating to the Ebola outbreak to enable Class 6.2 Category A solids to be shipped for disposal under new packing instructions, P622 and LP622. With the current pandemic, this is a timely introduction as it now facilitates the movement, for disposal, of infectious substances Category A (e.g. gloves, aprons, gowns, masks etc.), without requiring specific approval from the relevant authority. Labeline’s Compliance Manager Richard Shreeve All Change… New Rules for Road, Rail, Sea and Air Richard Shreeve, Compliance Manager at Labeline International gives an overview of the 2021 multimodal regulations governing the transport of dangerous goods Are you ready for 2021? Dangerous Goods...

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